Walsby Society

An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology by George Walford

The Walsby Society is concerned with the theories of the late Harold Walsby. [He] work in ideology; he also worked in other areas, notably in philosophy, mathematical logic, and the development of a dialectical algebra. His object, in all these studies, was to understand thought, thought itself and its effect upon the behaviour of people and of society.

The Walsby Society endeavours to carry on this work. It is a task which makes unusual demands upon those who would take part in it, for those who study thought must accept no restraints upon their own thinking. They must not regard any theory as proven, for this would be to exclude that theory from study. Those who would continue Walsby’s work can accept even his own results only provisionally and tentatively.  The greatest contribution anybody could make would be to prove all his results wrong; that would be a giant step forward along the path he strove to open up. The Walsby Society is concerned with Harold Walsby’s work but is not committed to acceptance of it. All that is required of those who would work with the Society is that their activities should be relevant; opposition is as welcome as support. – George Walford, Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology.

The Walsby Society (1953 – 1979) was the second group to study systematic ideology. It was preceded by the Social Science Association (circa 1940 – 1953) and followed by Ideological Commentary (1979 – 1994) and gwiep.net (1994 – present). The following papers are in the gwiep.net collection of works relating to systematic ideology. They are available for study by those applying for the George Walford International Essay Prize, offering £3,500 each year for the winner to spend at the college and on the course of the winner’s choice.

No Date
A D C B. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, one page. Appears to be part of an inventory of papers. Lists “The Absolutists, Democratic Union, Campaign against SPGP, Bulletins, Science and Ideology, SSA Groups, Ideology, Dialectical Materialism, Pamphlets.”

Approaches to Ideology. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Peter Shepherd. Photocopy, three pages. April 23 to June 25, Wednesdays. Syllabus and diagram for a ten-week course taught by Peter Shepherd at City University. “A large part of the intention of the course is to relate systematic ideology to other approaches to (and views of the nature of) ideology. Lists George Walford’s book Ideologies and their Functions, published in 1979.

Basic Research on Ideologies. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Uncredited. Ten pages. The Ideological Series is described as Eiketic, Statemic, Diastatic, Procoptic, Agonic, Udenic and Medenic. Mentions Ideological Groups in the Australian Labour Party and their Attitudes, published in 1965.

Battleground Interim Report. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Handbill, one page. London: George Walford.

Blea Tarn. Harold Walsby. Drawing.

Black is White. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, two pages.

Change: A Talk to Young People. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, seventeen pages.

Christmas Greetings from Braziers. Illustration by Bonnie Russell.

The Credalisation Cycle. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, two pages.

Draft Constitution for the Walsby Society Events Committee. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, incomplete, one page.

The Eido-Dynamic Levels. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, eleven pages. “A draft of certain criticism of The Domain of Ideologies, pages 224 to 226, and Atoms and Ideology, page 13 to end.”

GO TO 666. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Photocopy, incomplete, pages 4-12. A computer program begining “GO TO 666 / STOP / END / SUBROUTINE NUCLUS / DIMENSION JX(150,150), JY150,150), JZ (150)”

Introducing the “Libertarian Communism” Group. Handbill, two pages, photocopy only. “At the 1974 Delegate Meeting of the Socialist Party of Great Britain, nine members were under chage for ‘action detrimental to the interest of the Party” […] The nine of us, together with some other Socialists – some of whom have been in the S.P.G.B., some not – are now working towards a new Socialist Group.”

Movement for Social Integration. Pamphlet, four pages. Photocopy only. “Relating events and tendencies in every social field to the realisation of the best society humanly possible.”

Other People’s Politics: A Talk. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Manuscript, fourteen pages. Suggests an ideological series of five, and that apparent contradictions are to be accepted rather than resolved.

A Summary of Objections to the Object and Propositions presented to the Meeting of May 10 at Highgate intended to set up the Project for Systematic Ideology. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Handbill, two pages. Peter Shepherd.

Thoughts of a Reluctant Bookseller. George Walford. Photocopy, five pages. “As every bookseller knows (except for the young lady ex – very much ex – member of our staff who remarked ‘What a lovely bright shop this would be if it wasn’t for all those dirty old books’) the main difficulty in bookselling is the customers.”

Walsby Society. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Handbill, one page. “On Wednesday 22nd May […] at the home of Geoffrey Clark […] ELLIS HILLMAN will give a talk on mathematics, logic and dialectic, entitled THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS.”

Walsby Society. [London:] Walsby Society, nd.  Handbill, one page. History of the Walsby Society and biographic sketch of Harold Walsby by Nat Nesbit.

What I Believe. Photocopy of transcription, nine pages. Extracted from Alfred Korzybski’s 1949 book Manhood of Humanity.

1954
Braziers Park Weekend. Ipsden: Braziers Park. Handbill, photocopy, one page. 8-11 January 1954 “Democracy in a Changing World” by Harold Walsby. Includes ‘Democracy and Communications,’ ‘Growth of Mutual Dependence,’ ‘Am I My Brother’s Keeper?,’ ‘Half a Million Extra Every Week,’ ‘Poverty, Plenty and Freedom,’ ‘Collective and Individual Life,’ and ‘What Do We Do?’

Braziers Park Weekend. Ipsden: Braziers Park. Handbill, one page. 22-25 January 1954 “Self-Control in Man and Machine” by John Rowan. Includes ‘What is Cybernetics,’ ‘Are Animals Machines?,’ ‘The Human Brain as Machine,’ ‘What are the Limits of a Machine?,’ ‘Applications of Cybernetics in Industry and War,’ and ‘The Future of Cybernetics.’ Recommended reading includes The Domain of Ideologies by Harold Walsby.

Ideology – A Pioneer Study. P. J. Rollings. Manuscript, sixty-five pages.

1955
The S.S.A. and its Case – S.P.G.B. Questions Answered. Handbill, circa 1955. “The supposed soundness of your case and your hope for its success a hundred years from now will not save you from Mosley’s minions in 1955.”

The S.S.A. and its Case – S.P.G.B. Questions Answered. [London]: Social Science Association, nd. Handbill, two pages. Circa 1955. “You have been asking us these questions; they have cropped up at every branch we visited. Here, then, are our answers, once for all, set out for easy reference. Don’t waste our time by asking them again.”

The Public Opinion Quarterly. Volume 19 Number 1, Spring 1955. Pages 53-67 include Crisis Situations and Ideological Revaluation by Hans H. Toch, which cites The Domain of Ideologies by Harold Walsby.

Ordinary Share Certificate. 8 July 1955. One page. One share of Modern Age Educational Services Limited issued to Mrs. Alison Walford. Signed by directors [George?] Walford and Harold Walsby.

1956
The Meaning of Ideology. Arne Naess. Transcription, photocopy, fifty-seven pages. Forward, Introduction and Part B, Chapter 1 of Democracy, Ideology and Objectivity, Studies in the Semantics and Cognitive Analysis of Ideological Controversy by Arne Naess and associates, Cale University Press and Basil Blackwell, published for the Norwegian Research Council for Science and the Humanities, 1956. Includes citation of The Domain of Ideologies by Harold Walsby.

1959
The Conservative Illusion. M. Norton Auerbach. Transcription, two pages. Quotes from The Conservative Illusion by Auerbach, published by Columbia University Press 1959.

1961
Midwest Journal of Political Science. Volume 5 Number 4, Novem ber 1961. Pages 317-331 contains Ideology and Political Behavior by David W. Minar, which cites Harold Walsby and The Domain of Ideologies.

1963
G. W. Walford Bookseller. Ten catalogues from George Walford’s bookstore. List No. A/121 is dated 8/30/63C.

Appendix B: The Walsby Position. Peter Rollings. Manuscript, photocopy, six pages. Appendix to Peter Shepherd’s unpublished thesis on the Socialist Party of Great Britain.

Psychoanalysis as an Ideology. Peter Rollings. Circular, twenty-two pages. Paper for Staff Seminar, Department of Sociology, University of Ghana, 26 February 1963. (1) Photocopy (2) Original (3) Partial Manuscript.

A Project of Amity. N. Nesbit. Circular, photocopy, thirty pages. ‘Whit Monday’ 1963, with PostScript of 10 June and Addenda of 5 July. “For former members and supporters of the Social Science Association and the Movement for Social Integration and Others.” […] “Put at its simplest, the case to be presented here is that, had the SSA adopted the aims of the MSI, or had the MSI accepted the theory of the SSA, either would have had a satisfactory basis for enduring existence.” Includes history of the SSA and side projects / front groups such as the SSA Groups and Democratic Union. Annotations by George Walford.

Charity Begins at Work. P. R. Collins. Photocopy, two pages. From the Socialist Standard June 1963.

Proclaiming Battleground. George Walford. August 1963. Circular, two pages. Battleground is to be “an irregular and informal arena for the battle of ideas relating to the Socialist Party of Great Britain, the Movement for Social Integration, and the Social Science Association.”

Man’s Degradation. P. R. Collins. Photocopy, one page. From the Socialist Standard September 1963.

Battleground. Number 1 October 1963. London: George Walford. Periodical, twelve pages.

1964
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research. Volume 25 Number 1, September 1964. Pages 16-29 include Reflections About Total Views by Arne Naess, which cites The Domain of Ideologies by Harold Walsby.

1965
Origins and Limitations of the Walsby Viewpoint. Peter Shepherd.  “An adaption of some notes about Walsby and the SSA I wrote in April 1965, when in Ghana […] it was not published […] The 1965 notes were called ‘Thoughts on the African Identity’ and included an account and attempted analysis not only of that question and of ‘Social Rationality’ (the expression I used for Walsby’s concerns) but of ‘World Society.'”

1966
Harold Walsby Design Research Project. Harold Walsby. Circular, photocopy, three pages. “This Programme of Research accompanied Harold Walsby’s application for the Leon Fellowship at the University of London in February, 1966. […] It should be carefully noted that this Programme is but one small part of Harold Walsby’s present Design Research Project, the scope of which fundamentally connects Art with Science.”

1967
The Paradox Principle and Modular Systems Generally. Harold Walsby Design Science Project Paper #1. January 1967. (1) “Special Announcement to Potential Subscribers.” Circular, one page. Original and photocopy. (2) The Paradox Principle and Modular Systems Generally. Book, twenty-four pages. (3) The Paradox Principle and Modular Systems Generally “Rewritten in simpler language for Jennifer [Sprague?] by Charles Sprague.” Circular, fifty-one pages, photocopy only.

Ideology: A Pioneer Study. Peter Rollings. Circa 1967. Manuscript, twenty-five pages of photocopy and one hand-written page. “Based on two articles in Clare Market Review Summer 1953 and Lend 1954, and part of the third chapter of Dialectical Materialism: A New Development, a pamphlet published by Democratic Union about 1950; adapted slightly to bring the contents up to date.” Many references to the work of Harold Walsby from the 1940s to the 1960s.

Grasmere Newsletter. Number 2, February 1967. Grasmere: Design Research Project. Periodical, two pages.

Grasmere Newsletter. Number 3, November 1967. Grasmere: Design Research Project. Periodical, two pages.

1968
Grasmere Newsletter. Number 4, January 1968. Grasmere: Design Research Project. Periodical, two pages.

The Maintenance of an Idea-System: The Case of the Socialist Party of Great Britain.  P. J. Rollings.  Manuscript, 27 pages incomplete.  “Based on a paper read to a seminar on Systems Analysis held under the auspices of the Department of Politics of the University of Reading in February, 1968.”

1969
Antiquarian Bookseller. August 4-11 1969. Photocopy, page 217 only.

1971
Attitude to Paradox. 4 February 1971. Uncredited diagram on “Paradox in Everyday Life and Academic Life.”

Delta Meden. [Geoffrey Clark?] 20 May 1971. Invitation to a “fourth group set up concerned with Harold Walsby’s ideas.” Photocopy only.

Westmorland Gazette. 22 October 1971. One photocopied page only. “Now The World’s First Chromatic Light Pictures. Lakeland artist Harold Walsby has now produced, after much research, an entirely new type of picture. Colours and tones are not obtained by means of pigments, but by refracted light from inside the picture. This chromatic principle is essentially the same as that which produces the rainbow. It permits a number of interesting variations of pictoral effect, including change of design and colour as you watch. As Mr. Walsby is already overwhelmed with work in connection with the new chromatic-light picture, applying for patents, etc. – those who wish to take up an agency (abroad or parts of UK) and all enquirers for licenses, courses, and so forth, should apply not by post but at Windermere Galleries […] Exhibition opens Mon. 25th Oct ’71.”

1972
The American Political Science Review. Volume 66, Number 2, June 1972. Pages 498-510 contain On the Concept of Ideology in Political Science by Willard A. Mullins, which on page 500 cites Harold Walsby and The Domain of Ideologies.

1973
The History of the Dialectic. Harold Walsby. Manuscript, photocopy, twenty-eight pages. “Walsby issued this paper without a title; it has come to be known by the above title from its opening sentence. It was undated, and the best I can say is that it was issued a few years before his death in 1973. If anybody can provide further information it will be welcomed. George Walford, November 1981.”

Harold Walsby (1911-1973) A Brief Intellectual Biography. P. J. Rollings. Book, seven pages. “Prepared for a Commemorative Meeting at the Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London WC2 on May 31, 1973.” (1) commemorative edition (2) non-commemorative edition (3) announcement of commemorative meeting.

Systematics The Journal of the Institute for the Comparative Study of History, Philosophy and the Sciences. Volume 11 Number 3, December 1973. Photocopy, four pages only. Includes “Change in Ideology” by George Walford.

1974
Elementary Logic Lecture 2 The Distribution of Terms
. Uncredited [Harold Walsby?]. Manuscript, photocopy, four pages.

Introducing the “Libertarian Communism” Group. London: Libertarian Communism 1974. Uncredited. Handbill, one page. Announces new group founded by nine recently-expelled members of the Socialist Party of Great Britain.

Paradox Its Use and Representation. Julian Parker. 28 March 1974. “The paper reviews the motivation for wanting to understand paradox, it then considers some well-known folklore and mathematical ambiguities.” A paper by Julian Parker, presented to the Walsby Society at the home of Geoff Clarke. (1) Handbill, photocopy, one page. (2) Manuscript, photocopy, twenty-eight pages.

The First Harold Walsby Memorial Lecture: Power and Ideology by Steven Lukes. Handbill, one page.

Walsby Society Financial Statement. Circular, one page. 8 May 1974. Includes the first Harold Walsby Memorial Lecture and a financial statement about the Walsby Society.

Ideological Papers #2. The Walsby Society. July 1974. Periodical, twenty-three pages. “Issued out of sequence; #1 to follow.” Correspondence between George Walford and John Rowan.

Ideological Papers #1. The Walsby Society. September 1974. Periodical, sixteen pages. “Extracts from correspondence between John Rowan and Peter Rollings, August 1965 to February 1967.” (1) original (2) photocopy.

Direct Democracy. Peter Cadogan. London: Direct Democracy, November 1975. Book, second edition, photocopy, thirty-six pages. “The case for an England of sovereign regional republics, extra-parliamentary democracy and a new active non-violence of the centre.”

1975
The Monument / The Story of the Socialist Party of Great Britain. Robert Barltrop. Book. London, Pluto Press.

Dialectic, Hierarchy and Paradox. The Walsby Society. Circular, one page. “On Thursday March 13 1975, at the home of Geoffrey Clarke […] Peter Rollings will open a discussion on Marxism with a brief talk entitled ‘The Faces of Marxism and What They Conceal.'” Also announces “Dialectic, Hierarchy and Paradox, a Week-end Course on the Thought of Harold Walsby” at Braziers Park, 16-18 May 1975. “The course will consist of a number of talks and discussions dealing with Harold Walsby’s philosophical background, his dialectic algebra and his theory of ideological hierarchy. The convenor is George Walford but further details can be obtained in the first instance from Peter Rollings, Department of Sociology, University of Reading, Whiteknights, Reading.”

The Faces of Marxism and What They Conceal. Peter J. Rollings. “A brief talk given to the Walsby Society on March 13, 1975.” (1) introductory circular letter from Peter Rollings, 12 March 1975, one page (2) manuscript, twenty-six pages, annotations by John Rowan (?) (3) manuscript, twenty-six pages, annotations by George Walford (?).

The Transparent Mask of Marxism. George Walford. April 1975. Eight pages. “A paper suggested by the paper by Peter Rollings entitled ‘The Faces of Marxism and What They Conceal.’

Hyman Levy – An Obituary Note. The Walsby Society. Circular, one page. The Walsby Society will next meet “on April 10 1975 […] The purpose of the meeting will be to continue the discussion of Peter Rolling’s paper ‘The Faces of Marxism and What They Conceal,’ with the assistance of a further paper suggested by it entitled ‘The Transparent Mask of Marxism’ by George Walford.” Also includes an obituary note for Professor Hyman Levy (died 27 February, age 85). Professor Levy was cited in Harold Walsby’s book The Domain of Ideologies. Levy was a founding member of the British Communist Party and was a constant Soviet apologist until visiting the Soviet Union in 1956, when he learned first-hand of the persecution of Russian Jews. He was expelled from the Party after the publication of his book Jews and the National Question. “[Levy] can to know of Harold Walsby’s dialectic algebra in the middle 1960s and corresponded with him at length, offering him encouragement and arranging a meeting of mathematicians at Imperial College to listen to an exposition of the algebra by Harold Walsby. Last year [1974] he gave two talks to the [Walsby] Society, one private and extempore, the other in the form of a public lecture at Conway Hall, which attracted a substantial audience.”

The Faces of Marxism: Some Supplementary Comments. Peter Rollings. Circular, forty-four pages. “Offered to the Walsby Society for discussion at a meeting on April 16, 1975.”

The Myth of Right Reason: Ideology, Truth and the Sovereign Educators. Ronald Fletcher. Handbill, one page. “The Second Harold Walsby Memorial Lecture […] Friday 2 May [1975].”

Report of the Second Harold Walsby Memorial Lecture. Circular, one page. “Speaker: Ronald Fletcher, Professor of Sociology at East Anglia University. […] The speaker’s main argument was that the sociologists (Comte, Marx, Mill, Arnold, Durkheim, Hobhouse were mentioned) had developed a body of knowledge and methods of investigation which offered a possible route toward the study and possibly the treatment of social questions without the ‘manipulation’ involved in some other approaches. He expressed argument with several of the points made by Walsby in The Domain of Ideologies.”

Terminology. Charles Sprague. Circular, one page. 2 June 1975. “The desire for better names for the ideological levels has been voiced on various occasions.”

In Defence of Ideology. George Walford. Circular, nineteen pages. “A paper presented to the Walsby Society in November 1975.”

From Marxism to Ideology. George Walford. Circular, nineteen pages. “A paper presented to the Walsby Society in November 1975.” First use of the goldenrod-colored paper that George Walford would adopt for much of the rest of his published works.

The Transparent Mask of Marxism. George Walford. Second Revised Edition, November 1975. Eight pages. “A paper suggested by the paper by Peter Rollings entitled ‘The Faces of Marxism and What They Conceal.’

Is Market Anarchy Feasible? The Walsby Society. Circular, one page. “David Steele, until quite recently, was an active member of the Socialist Party of Great Britain (for about eight years from December 1964), will on Friday November 14 1975 […] give a talk entitled ‘Is Market Anarchy Feasible?’ at the home of George Walford.

1976
Harold Walsby’s Schematic Diagram of Ideological Development. (1) Typed and hand-drawn (2) Computer text and graphics. “Taken from Atoms and Ideology in The New Age of Atomics (SSA 1945).” Also lists “NEW TERMINOLOGY (1976).”

Harold Walsby, Independent Thinker.  Peter Shepherd, circa 1976.  “A draft Introduction for an intended second edition of Harold Walsby’s The Domain of Ideologies.”

Reply to a Socialist. George Walford. Circular, one page. February 1976. “An ideologist replies to a letter from a Socialist saying that he feels bound to continue struggling against the present order of things, whether or not his struggles are successful.”

The Ideology of Freedom. George Walford. London: The Bookshop. February 1976. Book, ten pages. “A commentary on The Machinery of Freedom by David Friedman.”

The Ideology of Ecology. George Walford. London: The Bookshop. February 1976. Book, seven pages. “A commentary on Manifesto for a Sustainable Society by The Ecological Party.”

The Ideology of a Monument. George Walford. London: The Bookshop. March 1976. “A commentary on The Monument / The Story of the Socialist Party of Great Britain by Robert Barltrop.” (1) Circular, one page. “With this sheet comes a copy, in advance of issue, of The Ideology of a Monument.” (2) The Ideology of a Monument. Book, six pages. Suspected advance issue. (3) The Ideology of a Monument. Book, six pages. Suspected edited issues. Two copies. See also Fire Over Europe.

Credo Quia Impossible. Bernard Levin. 18 April 1976. Periodical, source illegible. Clipping of a review of The Monument / The Story of the Socialist Party of Great Britain by Robert Barltrop.

A Happier Terminology. Charles Sprague. June 1976. Circular, one page. “Harold Walsby’s nomenclature of ideological levels has repeatedly been criticised. […] The question of a happier nomenclature cropped up in a recent meeting at Braziers Park, and in a relaxed discussion over several hours between Peter Rollings, George Gook and myself, gradually emerged the following terminology, which found favour also with George Walford. […] The terms themselves are Protostatic, Epistatic, Parastatic, Protodynamic, Epidynamic, Paradynamic, Metadynamic. The above is purely personal impression and view. Since I wrote it, PR suggested these terms should be referred to as ‘The Ipsden Nomenclature.'” Small annotation by Charles Sprague.

Bed and Bored. Uncredited. “TLS” 18 June 1976. Clipping of a review of Coming Together / Coming Apart by Jay Kuten.

The Transformation from the Eidostatic to the Eidodynamic Levels. George Walford. 25 July 1976. Manuscript, five pages.

Notes on the Ideology of Economics / Part One: Control of the Means of Production. George Walford. London: The Bookshop. “A paper presented to The Walsby Society in August 1976.”

An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology. George Walford. (1) Circular, one page, 27 September 1976. Sent to Charles Sprague, Peter Rollings, J. Pizer, Geoff Clark, George Gook, “MacGregor,” J. Thompson, John Rowan, Nat Nesbit soliciting feedback on Preliminary Issue for An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology. (2) An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology Preliminary Issue. Circular, twenty-five pages, October 1976. Uncredited annotations. (3) Comments on An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology. John Rowan. Manuscript, two pages, 8 October 1976. (4) An Outline Sketch of Systematic Ideology. London: The Bookshop, 1977. Book, thirty-two pages. (5) The Skeletal Framework of Systematic Ideology. Handbill, one page. Table showing relations between ideologies.

The Enduring Eidostatics. George Walford. November 1976. Book, twelve pages. Uncredited annotations (likely John Rowan).

Assumptions. Number 1, November 1976. London: The Bookshop. Periodical, eighteen pages.  Edited by Charles E. Sprague, distributed by George Walford.  About this Journal | On the Assumption that Nothing is Absolutely True by George R. Gook | The Other Half of the Half-Truth | Information Wanted | Copyright Note | The Basics of Systematic Ideology (1) by George Walford | Much Ado About Nothing by Charles E. Sprague | Suppliment to Assumptions, ‘A Philosophy of History’ by Karl Fedem, Chapter One.

Socialist Standard. Volume 72 Number 868, December 1976. London: The Socialist Party of Great Britain. Includes “Backed Wrong Horse” by R. Barltrop, which cites SPGB – Utopian or Scientific by Harold Walsby.

1977
The Power of Ideology. George Walford.  London: The Bookshop, circa 1977. (1) Book, 4 pages. (2) Manuscripts and cover letters, 12 pages.  “We have to look behind the political movements to the ideologies themselves.  Then we find that every major ideology has its part to play.  They all contribute to our wellbeing.  Those that support authority and those that support freedom.  Those that support private enterprise and those that support public control.  We need them all.”

Minorities and the Resurgence of Nationalism: The Fourth Harold Walsby Memorial Lecture. Anthony D. Smith. [1977] Handbill, one page.

Assumptions. Number 2. London: The Bookshop, February 1977 Edited by Charles E. Sprague, distributed by George W. Walford. (1) Periodical, 34 pages. Includes George Gook, George Walford, Charles Sprague and Margret Chisman. (2) Suppliment to Assumptions Number 2, ‘A Philosophy of History’ by Karl Federn, Chapter Two.

The Ideology of the Trade Union Movement. George Walford. Book, ten pages. “Presented to The Walsby Society April 1977.”

Why Not? George Walford. Circular, two pages. 6 April 1977. “The letter below was sent to the Socialist Standard on 16th February 1977. It has not been printed. It has not been acknowledged.”

The Walsby Society. Peter Millo Shepherd. Circular, six pages, May 1977.

Socialist Standard. Volume 73 Number 873, May 1977. London: The Socialist Party of Great Britain. Includes “What is Our IQ?” by George Walford and an uncredited reply.

Assumptions. Number 3. London: The Bookshop, May 1977 Edited by Charles E. Sprague, distributed by George W. Walford. Periodical, 52 pages. Includes George Gook, B. Gook, George Walford, and Charles Sprague.

The Ideology of Everyday Life. George Walford. Book, ten pages. “A paper presented at the Walsby Society Conference at Braziers Park, Ipsden, Oxfordshire, in June 1977.”

Socialist Standard. Volume 73 Number 875, July 1977. London: The Socialist Party of Great Britain. Includes “Class & Understanding” by George Walford and an uncredited reply.

Assumptions. Number 4. London: The Bookshop, August 1977 Edited by Charles E. Sprague, distributed by George W. Walford. Periodical, 22 pages numbered 53-73. The Walsby Society by Peter Millo Shepherd | The Future of Mankind by Leon Geerinckx (translated by Charles E. Sprague) | Trouble with Half-Truths by Mark Tenniel | An Ideological Classification of Argument by George R. Gook | Letters to the Editor by George Walford and Douglas B. Foy | The Handle of a Cup of Tea is on the Inside by John Rowan | The Chief Who Stood Up by Jack Hyams.

The Project for Systematic Ideology. George Walford. Circular, four pages. “The study now known as ‘systematic ideology’ was founded by the late Harold Walsby. In 1973 The Walsby Society was established to carry on his work, in ideology and in other fields also. In September 1977 the Project for Systematic Ideology developed out of the Walsby Society to concentrate upon systematic ideology. (The Walsby Society of course continues).”

You Cannot Join the Walsby Society. George Walford. Circular, one page. “The object of The Walsby Society is to develop and to make known the work of the late Harold Walsby. The Society has no formal membership, no funds, no Constitution. People who take part in its work do so on their own initiative, on their own responsibility and at their own expense. […] Stop press: a Conference on Comparative Ideology is being arranged for September 1977.”

Conference on Comparative Ideology. Peter Shepherd. Circular, four pages with annotations [John Rowan?]. Held at Holly Royde College, West Didsbury, near Manchester, September 9 & 10 1977. Included presentations by John Fowler, Jack Taylor, George Walford, Malcolm Hamilton and Peter Shepherd.

Spur News. September 1977. Number 9. Periodical, twelve pages. London: Study Panel for United Research. Edited by Alan Mayne. Members of SPUR include Peter Hunot, Alan Mayne, Margaret Chisman, Adrian Williams and others. Includes “A review of systematic ideology – the ideas of Harold Walsby and George Walford.”

The Project for Systematic Ideology. George Walford. Circular, four pages. “The study now known as ‘systematic ideology’ was founded by the late Harold Walsby. He had other interests also. In 1973 The Walsby Society was established to carry on his work, and in October 1977 the Project for Systematic Ideology was started, to concentrate upon systematic ideology. The Walsby Society of course continues.”

Intended for Publication. George Walford. Circular, one page. 7 October 1977. Circular letter to the editor of SPUR News.

Ideology and the Sociologist: A Study in Systematic Ideology. George Walford. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, November 1977. Book, three pages. “This paper sets out to show that the sociologists who study ideology tend to take an unduly restricted view of it. There is reason to believe that its influence extends farther than they recognise.”

Ideology, Autonomous or Ephemeral? A Study in Systematic Ideology. George Walford. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, November 1977. Book, four pages. “The statement that ideology is determined by a life that includes ideology leaves open the question it was intended to answer, the question whether ideology is epiphenomenal (determined by non-ideological factors) or autonomous (self-determined).”

Why Socialism Won’t Work. Manuscript, thirteen pages. Speech delivered by Peter Shepard at South Place Ethical Society (General Secretary: Peter Cadogan) in November 1977. Annotated by George Walford.

1978
The Centre of Life. Manuscript, two pages, incomplete. Transcribed quotes from The Centre of Life by L. L. Larison Cudmors, published in 1978.

The Letter the Socialist Standard Didn’t Print. George Walford. London: The Walsby Society, March 1978. Book, eight pages.

Circular. Ike Benjamin and George Walford. Circular, one page, 11 May 1978. “First, GW wants to apologise for having led you to waste an evening. […] It seems necessary, after last night, to alter the title [of this project] to Systematic Ideology Project. This, incidentally, would meet Adrian [William]’s point about the other organisation calling itself PSI.”

A Half-Open Letter to Peter Shepherd from George Walford. Circular, two pages, 16 May 1978. “When these splits within a microscopic group begin to seem too absurd to be tolerable I console myself with the recollection that at one time Trotsky belonged to ‘The Party of Two’.”

From NIAT to PSI and Beyond. George Walford. Circular, five pages, 30 May 1978. “Over the past months papers have been circulated concerning the establishment of the Project for Systematic Ideology. […] A meeting was called for May 10th. At that meeting, and since, there has been a good deal of emotion around, much of it negative and most of it coming from me. […] The emotional upsets of the past weeks have done much to clarify my thinking, and this paper is one of the results.”

Walsby Memorial Lectures. George Walford. Circular, one page, 17 August 1978. “My recommendation is that the series of Annual Memorial Lectures be continued, but that in future, beginning with 1979, the lectures be concerned directly, explicitly and substantially with the works of Harold Walsby.”

Spur News. September 1978. Number 10. Periodical, eighteen pages. London: Study Panel for United Research. Edited by Alan Mayne. Includes “More about systematic ideology” by George Walford and Adrian Williams.”

With this handbill… Undated [circa September 1978]. Handbill, one page. “With this handbill is sent a copy of SPUR NEWS No. 10, including references to systematic ideology.”

November Events 1978. Peter Shepherd. Circular, two pages.

To Peter M. Shepherd. George Walford. Circular, one page. 27 October 1978. Responce to Peter Shepherd’s circular ‘November Events 1978.’

To George Walford. Peter Shepherd. Circular, 31 October 1978. Response to George Walford’s circular letter of 27 October 1978.

Clarity. Berkhamsted: Mensa Christian Group. Volume 10 Number 4, [after November] 1978. Periodical, photocopy of five pages only. Includes ‘Much Ado About Nothing’ by Charles E. Sprague, originally appearing in Assumptions Number 1, about Harold Walsby’s theories on Nothing. Also includes Margret Chisman.

The Walsby Society. Circular, two pages, December 1978. Details meeting for 2 November; announces meetings for 23 November 13 December, 17 January.

To Those Intending to Take Part in the November 23 Meeting of the Walsby Society Systematic Ideology Study Group or Any Meeting Resulting Later From It. Peter Shepherd. Circular, six pages, 21 November 1978.

OPEN MEETING… ” London: Project for Systematic Ideology. Handbill, one page, 13 October [1978]. Announcement of meeting of the Project for Systematic Ideology on 13 October [1978] and that George Walford will speak at the Unitarian Church at Hoop Lane, Golders Green on 22 October.

PSI Open Meeting. London: Project for Systematic Ideology. Handbill, one page, 23 November 1978. Announcement of a meeting on 30 November 1978 on ‘The Ideology of Ecology.’ Included Alan Mayne, George Walford, Margret Chisman. Also announces Victor Serebriakov will give a talk on systematic ideology at a Mensa ‘think-in’ in 1979; and Colin Fry will address the PSI in January 1979.

1979
Beyond Ecology
. George Walford. London: The Bookshop, 1979. ISBN 0-9505445-3-1. Book, twenty-three pages.

The Unscientific Socialists. George Walford. London: The Walsby Society, [1979]. Circular, two pages. “An open letter to the editors of the Socialist Standard and the members and supporters of the Socialist Party of Great Britain.”

January 1979. Peter Shepherd. Circular, five pages. “The over-all thrust of my paper is intended to be along the lines that (a) no satisfactory formulation of metadynamic objectives has yet been offered, (b) such formulation of objectives is characteristically the last such formulation of a new and distinct phase of ideological development, and (c) the road to adequate formulation of metadynamic objectives is indicated by Walsby’s emphasis on freedom from limitation in his account of the absolute assumption, by the characteristic metadynamic valuation of conflict, and by the (MSI) asympotic conception of the ideal society.”

PSI Circular. Number One. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, January 1979. Periodical, two pages.  Coming Attractions | Modern Maimonides | Conservative Conservationists | Notes for Speakers | The Future.

PSI Circular. Number Two. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, February 1979. Periodical, five pages. Pay Up or Else | Now Showing | Mensa Think-In | PSI Open Evening | Publications | Shoot Them Down | Why Do They Do It? | Has It Occurred to You | Parts and Wholes | In Russia One Wall is Enough | Ecology Ideology | Up with Vandalism | the Personal and the Public | Knowledge is Better than Ignorance Is It? | Remember.  “Galley proofs have been received for the the forthcoming book Systematic Ideology / A Study of Ideologies and their Functions. The printers have promised delivery of the completed work by the end of April 1979.”

Ideology Before Walsby. Peter Hunot. March 1979. Circular, four pages. “Some notes on Karl Mannheim’s work on ideology.”

PSI Circular. Number Three. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, March 1979. Periodical, six pages. PSI Open Evening | PSI Open Meeting | Hitler’s Ideology | One is Sometimes | The Don with the Tenebrous Prose | A Professor Who | Is It Not True | One Job Which | Enquiring About | The Gossip Columnists | Many People | Did You Hear |

PSI Circular. Number Four. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, April 1979. Periodical, two pages. PSI Open Meeting | We Are Assured | The Steady Advance | Review | It Can’t Happen | So You Thought.

PSI Circular. Number Five. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, May 1979. Periodical, six pages.

PSI Circular. Number Six. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, June 1979. Periodical, two pages.

The Unscientific Socialists Part II. George Walford. London: The Walsby Society, June 1979. Circular, two pages. “An open letter to the editors of the Socialist Standard and the members and supporters of the Socialist Party of Great Britain.”

Harold Walsby and the Walsby Society. Peter Shepherd. Handbill, four pages, July 1979.

PSI Circular. Number Seven. London: Project for Systematic Ideology, July 1979. Periodical, two pages. A review of Pulsar 1. “My acquaintance with science fiction is longer than that of most who read it today. It began in the late 1920s, when Hugo Gernsback’s Amazing Stories used to come across the Atlantic (I was told many years later) as ballast. I used to buy them from a tiny shop which also sold secondhand clothes and cat’s meat. They cost 2d each and they were enormous, or seemed so. Since I was about nine years old my own size may have helped to produce that impression. As I now recall their contents they were mainly about Z-rays and flying cabbages, but that is probably unfair; anybody who reads them then as as an adult might now retain a different impression. […] George Hay in his Introduction – a taut piece of writing which admirably sets the purposeful tone carried by the whole collection – says that Pulsar 1 is ‘intended to serve as a platform’ for ‘writers, scientists and humanists’ (emphasis added). The inclusion of humanists among those expected to use a science-fiction platform shows how far this collection goes beyond the old idea of what science-fiction ought to be.”

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